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Onion Rinse: Yay or Nay?

The onion rinse is one of many natural hair growth remedies that are highly suggested and praised for actually working.  However, nobody seems to mention the draw back of the onion rinse.  Yes, it’s smelly, but you can get used to it or do it at night and wash your hair in the morning.  The problem with the onion rinse is it’s only good for two days and then it begins to go bad.  Like molding bad.  Cheers for fresh onion. If you’ve cooked with fresh onion before, then you know that you have to be careful with it.  Fresh onion will cause a dish to go bad or mold sooner than it ought to if certain precautions are not taken.  You do NOT put a previously used utensil in a dish with fresh onion unless your intention was to through it away the next day.  This is the #1 problem with the onion rinse.  For maximum potency and benefits the rinse must be fresh, but a freshly brewed rinse doesn’t last more than 2 days.  That’s a waste of a perfectly good onion.  Just saying. Yes, onions are high in sulfur.  Don’t get me wrong sulfur is very good […]
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So You Want to Henna

Your hair can benefit from henna, but the type of henna you use can be good or bad for your hair.  First of all, henna is only composed of the plant called Lawsonia inermis.  If your henna has more in it than that plant, use it at your own risk.  Henna has become so commercialized that, like tofu, you need to question the quality and source.  If the instructions on the package have special requirements for mixing it, like don’t use metal, use it at your own risk.  Henna is an herb.  Like most herbs, it’s best to use glass when using them to make anything because glass does not absorb the properties.  However, using metal to mix them won’t hurt.  Unless you are dealing with fresh onion. If you have tried henna before and it didn’t work for you or you feel like it ruined your hair, think about how you mixed it or the quality of it.  Henna is a plant that is used to condition the hair and scalp as well as deposit it’s natural color.  It is not used to moisturize the hair and scalp.  So if your hair came out rough, it’s okay.  Your mix […]
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Battle of the Products

So everyone is raving about this product (insert a hair product or hair product line that comes to mind).  You start researching the product and stalking it, waiting for it to go on sale.  Finally, you buy it and you’re excited!  You just can’t wait to use this AMAZING product(s) everyone has been raving about.  So you insert the new product(s) into your hair care routine, and when you’ve finished your hair, your reaction is… Whether you’re screaming because of how your hair looks or because of how it feels, you’re still screaming.  Now you’re trying to figure out if you can return the product(s) or if you’re stuck with it.  You also might be panicking because you have somewhere to be and your hair is just having a ball at your expense.  So now you’re like…  And the only thing you can do is start from the beginning.  Do you know the worst part of this whole scenario?  The reason the product(s) didn’t work could be your fault.  Shopping for products is more than just reading the reviews and reading the ingredient list.  There’s one key component to product shopping that people often forget.  No, it’s not whether the […]
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Is My Hair Protein Sensitive?

The correct answer is no.  Nobody’s hair can be protein sensitive.  Why?  Because our hair is made of protein.  If people’s hair were protein sensitive they would be bald.  Let’s take a moment to reflect on what hair is made of. Hair is approximately 91% protein and it’s made up of amino acid chains.  The outer covering of the hair is made up of keratin and is most commonly known as the cuticle.  The inner layer is the cortex, which is keratinized protein fibers.  The inner most layer is the central core of cells called the medulla.  That’s why if you have frayed ends from color, misuse and abuse, no trims, etc. you can use an egg mask to help temporarily fix your ends or your hair in general.  The protein in eggs enters the lifted cuticles and temporarily fills the holes in your hair cuticles.  This temporary fill helps strengthen your hair for a short while until your next trim. Now as for those who claim their hair is protein sensitive it’s not your hair.  It’s you.  Have you checked your diet?  Have you compared the protein levels of all your current hair products?  Sometimes your diet is so full […]
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The Run Down: Minerals and Vitamins

          I decided to do a rundown of on the vitamins and minerals that can be found in our products.  Though we hear that certain herbs are great for this and that, rarely do we hear the why.  What makes one combination herbs better than another combination?  Well it’s the vitamin and mineral content within a specific combination of herbs.  If the combination of herbs isn’t right then they can cancel out properties of “weaker” herbs.  The same concept applies for vitamins and minerals ingested or topically applied.  Too much of a good thing either gets thrown off, canceled out by something else, or wreaks havoc on your system.  We work to make sure our products are balanced and healthy.  Here’s the why behind some of our ingredient choices: I.  Iron: It carries oxygen to the scalp and promotes growth by helping with blood circulation.  Blood circulation is essential for carrying nutrients to every part of your body. II.  D: We usually get this from the sun.  It helps with the hair follicle life cycle.  However, during winter and rainy season especially, we need products with vitamin D to supplement the lack of it due to […]
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What Is the Average Growth Rate for Hair?

Hair growth.  Most of us have googled it or searched for it somewhere before.  Whether it was because we over processed our hair or got a short hair cut (and immediatly regretted it) is beside the point.  What we were looking for was a way(s) to either get our hair back or speed up the process.  Just as we go through growth phases as we are approaching adulthood our hair goes through growth phases…repeatedly.  So here’s the rundown on what you hair goes through. Phase 1:    It is also known as the Anagen Phase.  Anagen is the active phase of the hair. The cells in the root of the hair are dividing rapidly. A new hair is formed and pushes the club hair (a hair that has stopped growing or is no longer in the anagen phase) up the follicle and eventually out.  During this phase the hair grows about 1 cm every 28 days. Scalp hair stays in this active phase of growth for two to six years.  Some people have difficulty growing their hair beyond a certain length because they have a short active phase of growth. On the other hand, people with very long hair have a long active […]
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